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.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
about is that stuff comes up from underground. new laws in colorado, pennsylvania, and ohio which release information about the hydraulic fracturing chemicals say notwithstanding any of the above. we don't have to tell you reactions, anything we bring up from underground. that's dumb. that's just adding to the secrecy, adds to the fears, adds to the concerns, and i'm not saying there are no toxicology effects in the gulf, but reviewing it with my colleagues and reviewed all previous gulf things and snitted -- submitted to the new england journal of medicine, the reviewers were concerned that we were not saying enough about how many people would get leukemia from benzine from the spill, and the answer is probably nobody, but the psychosocial effects are reel. we have to work on communicating with the public. >> just a leadership observation, in the events i've been involved in, i've always tried to use the standard of transparency as the way to deal honestly and forthrightly with the public. the problem is that if you inadd veer -- inadvertently did not disclose information, you ar
to creating pro-growth tax law that will enable american companies to compete effectively against companies that are domicile in other countries around the world we need a level playing field. the united states has the highest corporate tax rate in the world. also the united states is one of the few countries in the world with a system that is called a global tax system rather than a territorial tax system. the 113th congress we are going to continue to advocate for comprehensive tax reform that broadens the base that reduces corporate tax rates and moves through a competitive territorial system. proctor and gamble pays income taxes and over 100 countries around the world. a business tax reform should provide a level playing field so that each business has the confidence of knowing it pays roughly the same amount of income tax as its competitors in markets with at home and abroad. in terms of deficit reduction, the obvious problem that must be addressed is the problem that currently the united states has been spending at a rate that far exceeds the rate of revenue that we are receiving. the
with the a ministration. the pendant that was put into the law when there were set up which made them an independent voice cannot sell rights, it was really important. they should not try to be friendly with some particular administration. their job was to be a watchdog. a watchdog over with the demonstration was doing. and they learned that. and then when kennedy was assassinated and johnson was uprose civil-rights because of that the civil rights act of '64 and '65, actually enacted into law. >> of a point did you become aware in your life of the civil rights commission? >> i became aware of them when i was in the graduate program university. asked if i work on a project. >> sixty's, 70's. >> yes. i used some of the reports because the reports they did were very good reports. some of the historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally by the time the commission as to me since i've do legal and constitutional history file would read something of a history of abortion rights for them and how that all played out and what the history had been all the way back to england and so on.
. the past few times we've invited someone from the department of justice the federal law mandates all federal agencies shall cooperate fully with the commission. they won't send to testify at any time in the past couple of years. so it kind of the allies at least one false myth and that is that the military doesn't take this issue very seriously. so after trying to compliment you, i did want to -- i think to the vice admiral to get up to speed on some of the issues some of the biggest improvements for the kind of career tracking that i think you'll have the lead on in the media and those of us that are -- i was a very brief litigator but prosecutors and other litigators you learn to be a great lawyer by watching the great council, criminal defense working side by side, then having them available to counsel you and for the c-span viewers who may not know why if you could elaborate and explain, as i've been able to understand it there were incentives for those that entered the job corps to be assigned prosecutors but they were to be stationed elsewhere and wasn't quite the rewards of a
an officer. the united states capital police are responsibility in conjunction with law enforcement partners is to ensure the safety of those attending the natural ceremonies throughout the weekend. first and foremost we want everyone to enjoy the democratic process and this is tort day. with any event that occurs on the capital complex safety is our number one priority. that said, safety and security for potus, guests etc. is not carried out just by us but by partnership with our law enforcement community that would include but not limited to the metropolitan police, the park police and other entities as well as public safety entities. the partnership that we have established to create a pretty robust multifaceted security plan has been in the works for many months and while i cannot go into details, about those security plans please know that we have trained extensively to address any issues that may come up during the day. thank you. >> thank you, officer i appreciate that and as someone who is in security and communications before heading back to the campaign last year i can tell you dur
or not these types of droughts and events have occurred in the past, they have. and as a result, the laws of chance simply tell us that they will happen again spent before we get to the policy question, this kind of goes with what we just addressed here, and margaret, you're a case study, and this is a question from alan. is question is, are you aware of any case studies where particular communities actually did take a proactive approach for drought management, and where it worked and where we could take a case -- take a look at the case study and applied elsewhere? >> well, i guess i would have to go back to historic times, because as i mentioned before i worked with navajo communities and so i know a lot about the way people coped with drought before reservation lands were established. and one of the things that people did was they were more aware of how the ecosystem operated, and would move according to what the current conditions work. they would move their livestock so they were more flexible, and the permitting systems and the types of things we have in place now as far as land tenure and wh
to come from the congress. they make the laws. they have created this massive thing called dodd-frank, which we are only part weaker in terms of interpreting and figuring out how to work. and i think it's much more appealing and i believe that the community bankers support will be fully supported on this issue. this is something we have been bird dogging, just to go back to the litter references and i think it's gaining momentum going. but it will not be easy. as i said earlier, is benefiting, lawyers and bureaucrats. john. [inaudible] i am half australian, this is water. yes, sir. >> i'm rubber weisner with public citizen. thank you for leading us on this. i have a two-part question, maybe it's two questions disguised as one. you know better than me barney frank and chris god we say we dealt with too big to fail and they meant it. as you're saying as regulators we really mean it and that's not sufficient to convince either bankers are markets. so i'm curious the part you didn't emphasize, but that drug. that's the plan for government intervention to separate the institution and
an enormous amount of money as his law partner and kind of takes care of the widow and young girl and pays for them, says them up in a nice home. he becomes the godfather of the little girl, francis. they are very close. she calls them uncle cleve. he closer frankie. he pays to send her to college. but happens is francis is growing up and her relationship changes from uncle cleve to godfather to a romantic interest. cleveland started sending her letters. it's the full-court press on courting her. >> now joining us here on her booktv set is trained to. her most recent book is so spoke the earth -- "so spoke the earth". in january 2010, where were you? >> i was here in miami and the deeper market with my daughter when someone called me and said there had been an earthquake in haiti. of course so many lives were changed at a loss to family members and many friends in the country that something like 200,000 people. >> host: when did you get to haiti after the earthquake? >> guest: i had a little baby at the time, slated back until three weeks later to see some family and friends and how they w
law that eventually came apart in 1964. the student newspaper supported the marchers. we had some black students in chapel hill at that time and felt that if they couldn't eat in the same restaurants with all the rest of us, that budget right. and so all of these photographs were taken initially for either the student newspaper or for i served as a string err for some of the -- stringer for some of the local wire services and what not. today in publishing the book one of the purposes was to let some of today's generation who still live in chapel hill and are descendants from the people in photographs know and understand what their parents and grandparents did so that they can enjoy the same freedoms that in some manner they take for granted often today to be able to go into a lunch counter or wherever. >> host: so 1961-1964, and i'm guessing you can speak to the majority of these and you can recall the moment? we're looking at this one right here, group of folks in front of a merchant's association. >> guest: after having picketed for a number of months, they decided it was time t
that are not authorized by law. number six, congress routinely raise the social security trust fund to cover general revenue shortfalls. >> guest: if you look at the appropriation bills come which have not been on the last two years because of the political dynamic going on and you go when they were put in x amount of money and look at how many programs, it's over $350 billion now. programs that are funded that are not authorized by the congress. which tells you there's an imbalance in congress is heavily appropriate funds for a program we haven't said we should be spending money on any toes see you the power of the appropriations committees in the power of pork or benefit to the states. what's most important? is the most important to look at an oklahoma at the amount of money i can direct their? or is it more important to think of the long run, with the help of our country in the long run and how do we make this type decisions? politically puts you on the losing side of every argument, that you work hard to explain yourself. poster number seven, members of congress don't have the opportunity to rea
counseling program that goes above and beyond anything that i would put into law. all of the students at elgin community college in elgin, illinois, must submit a monthly budget detailing all their costs when they are seeking financial aid. the student then has a mandatory one-on-one meeting with a counselor to review the loan balance, the repayment options and what happens if you default. this community college has implemented a workshop for students who will be graduating during the upcoming semester to discuss repayment options and give them a complete summary of every loan they have taken out. these students are facing debt the likes of which they have never seen in their lives. they are motivated by all of the preaching they have heard from their parents like me saying go to school, get a degree. they are ready to sign up because they want to do what they think is the right thing. they don't know a for-profit school is worthless. they don't know that thousands and thousands of debt will never be able to be repaid. and they don't know that debt will be with them for a lifetime. so
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12